423b2e
423b2e

11.19.2011

public service announcement



A spanish blogger,
Alberto Granados, left a message on one of my blogs requesting information about this painting. I traveled to his blog, entitled Alberto Granados, and with my piece-meal spanish managed to deduce that he has been searching the net high and low looking for the name of the painter and any additional information regarding the painting. I've done two image searches: one at Tineye and one using Google's Reverse Image search engine. They led me to 3 other Spanish speaking blogs - all using the image but none with any specific info about the painting.

So I am posting his request here on my blog. Feel free to pass the word along to other bloggers.
If you find anything about 'La Mer' as he has titled it, you can leave a comment at his blog (he understands English) or email him at: quequereisqueosdiga@gmail.com

Good luck!

xxx

34 comments:

gz said...

Here is suggestion from Vanessa on downsizer.net forum
"Not for certain, no ... but the fabrics look remarkably like the painting of Lord Frederick Leighton's work. http://www.passionforpaintings.com/paintingdatabase/skin1/images/catalog/categories/oil%20paint/l/leighton_lord_frederick/[leighton_lord_frederick]leighton_sisters/big.jpg for comparison."

gz said...

I've passed the query on to Dru- I think you might like her blogging too
http://dru-withoutamap.blogspot.com/

Adullamite said...

Good pic and I want to be there! Lazy middle class women ogling sailors while husband brings in the cash.

soubriquet said...

My vote's against Leighton, naughty old fellow.

red dirt girl said...

Thank you gz for posting the query at downsizer and forwarding it to Dru. Hopefully, the more the image gets circulated, someone will know it and be able to pass the info along to Sr. Granados. Now I'M curious!! You're the best!

xxx

red dirt girl said...

Adullamite! My what strong labels you use there: lazy, middle-class, ogling ...... how do you not know that maybe her husband is a captain of one of those ships in the harbor .....or she's a mistress......Not all of us women need a husband to bring home the cash!!

xxx

red dirt girl said...

Soubry - Ok so we know who you DON'T think it is, how about helping us figure out who the painter is!!!

xxx

Dru Marland said...

sorry, likewise a bit clueless. She reminds me of one of Alma-Tadema's languid women, with a nod in the direction of the dying consumptive in 'Fading Away'; it would be nice to think that she might be a shipowner, pausing from her tallybook to search for an incoming cargo; not v likely, though, as she's at the mercy of the artist's intention. Boats are insufficiently delineated to determine their type, though presumably fishing. Lots of toing-and-froing in the offing, and that window wouldn't last long on an Atlantic coast. So maybe Mediterranean? -or possibly just fanciful composition...

soubriquet said...

I was figgering who it wasn't. And I'll bet real money it wasn't Leighton.
As Sherlock Holmes said, "when you've eliminated the impossible, whatever's left is the true explanation". Or something like that. Because I'm really trying hard, I've managed to eliminate Picasso, David Hockney and Brigid Riley. I'm still working on Rubens, I think that she's a bit too skinny to be one of his. Leonardo, he's a tricky feller, all that science and mathematickal stuff, he might have built a time machine and painted her, but if he had, them there ships might have had clockwork propulsion.

Fractionally more seriously, I can confirm I've been studying the image after putting it through denoising and tweaking contrast gradients, and I'm still none the wiser. The original image is a very poor, low resolution mess. There appears to be a signature in the lower left corner, but I can't render it legible.
The boats outside are fishing boats, but that general outline doesn't tie them to any particular place. Her dress, dyed with aniline dyes, would not look out of place in 1890-1900, though I imagine a fashion-historian might pin it closer. The caned seated chair is about right for the turn of the century too. I'd like to think south coast of England,
I think the window is open, you can see a centre glazing-bar in the upper part. (Though, by 1900, single panes of plate glass could be used, and were quite strong enough to survive an atlantic placement, they were often over half an inch thick, heavy, strong, and very expensive).
I know you think I was slacking in the quest for the answer, but to suggest so does me a great dis-service, and now I must crawl away to my kennel, to weep pitifully.

red dirt girl said...

Soubry,

Nice work. Unfortunately, we are still at the same place we started: a mystery! No I didn't think you were slacking, only being facetious. Now I shall go flog myself with a wet noodle for making you cry!

xxx

red dirt girl said...

Hi Dru~

Thanks for taking time out to try and sort this mystery for me! I did go and take a look at Alma-Tadema's ladies and agree with you, this isn't one of his. And unfortunately this is a very poor resolution image, which does not help.

thank you again,
xxx

Alberto Granados said...

Well, I like writing short stories and I've thoght, from the fisrt moment, she is waiting for a sailor, but not her husband (probably a stupid man), but her lover, a ship captain.
Lots of thanks, everyone. I'll keep contact.

Specially thankfull for red dirt girl work.

AG

red dirt girl said...

Best of luck, AG ~ we'll keep searching.

xxx

goatman said...

Looks like a tapestry to me.
Not everything is on the web or in "the cloud".

red dirt girl said...

Hi goatman,

Not a huge fan of the web, eh?
(it brought us together...)

xxx

Nell said...

Sir John Everett Millais? The features look right.
sort of not quite as perfect as Rosetti yet porcelane.

red dirt girl said...

Hi Nell,

Thanks for responding. I'm looking at Millais' paintings and ... I just don't know. I'm not an artist, so I am going with gut reactions here. There is a difference in the quality of 'light' in the mystery lady's painting and those of Millais...

xxx

mochyn said...

There may be someone at Birmingham Museums and Art Galleries who would know: they have quite a few Pre-Raphaelites, some very obscure. (Mrs Sargeant-Florence, for example).

Alberto Granados said...

Probably Nell is right. If one compares this picture with "Yes or not" or "Yes", both by Everett Millais, one may draw the conclusion the girl is the same in the three paintings. But I'm not sure.

Regards from Granada (Spain)

AG

red dirt girl said...

Hi Mochyn ~ that's a good suggestion. I'll look into forwarding the pic to someone there.

Hi Alberto ~ "Yes" I disagree with, but "Yes or No" ... Hmmm. There are similarities. Many of Millais' paintings have multi-layered details in them. But "Yes or No" is quite simple in comparison. So ???? I'm going to attempt contacting someone at the Birmingham Museums and Art Galleries. Will keep you posted! In the meantime, happy hunting :)

thanks to all!
xxx

red dirt girl said...

ps. I love Granada. I spent my 40th birthday there on holiday. Beautiful city. Beautiful people. The Alhambra!!! Thank you for reminding me.

xxx

Alberto Granados said...

Have you read/seen this?
http://albertogranados.wordpress.com/2011/11/28/imagenes-de-granada-10-el-carmen-de-las-tres-estrellas-y-otras-albayzinerias/

Probably you'enjoy it.

Regards

AG

Anonymous said...

Sorry. I mean You'll enjoy it.

AG

red dirt girl said...

Hi AG ~

Indeed I did enjoy your story and photos very much! I now have the desire to return and walk the streets of the Albayzin again. Thank you for the link.

PS your English is far better than my Spanish. No need to apologize!

xxx

Alberto Granados said...

I don't think so! I've been an English teacher for a lot of years, but only for pre-Primary and Primary school, so I've forgot most of my English after neary forty years without chances for practising and revising.
Nowadays I'm a retired (an happy) man and spend my time in such an interesting thing as searching for my "painting" or blogging.

Than you for your kind interest in my obsession.

AG

soubriquet said...

I'm really interested by this search, RDG sent me a Millais pic with a girl who looks so very much like the subject of this picture.
What has transpired from this is that Alberto and Red Dirt Girl together have brought this picture to my notice, and to the notice of others, who've looked more closely, thought more, mentally compared it with images in our heads and in our libraries.
I do this with poems, I read the poem and want more. I have a hundred imaginary pictures, and imaginary stories about her.

Thank you, both of you. I'm really hoping somebody, somewhere, will recognise the painting and painter, so I really can know more.

Alberto:
Your English is fine. I wish I could write so well in another language. If you make an error, remember that we native english-speakers make errors too.
Your comments here are grammatically more correct than many of our newspaper writers can manage.
I wish that I could read your blog in Spanish, rather than in google's translation.

red dirt girl said...

Hi AG ~

I'm quite embarrassed. There was a time that I could read and write passably well in Spanish. At the time, I was living in Guatemala, so I had many opportunities to expand my Spanish. Now that I have been living in Texas for the last 10 years, I rarely get to practice, and I'm finding that I'm losing my Spanish! So sad. Thank you for bringing your 'obsession' to me. I love a good mystery and I am determined to find out who our mystery lady is! And I'm happy to have made a new blogging friend as well. Please keep in touch.

xxx

Alberto Granados said...

O course, we'll keep on touch. Just in a few minutes I'll publish a new post. This time, about a Spanish writer, Antonio Muñoz Molina, one of the best novels writer.
He lives in Madrid and N York, where was the head manager of Cervantes Institute.
have yor read any of his novels? Really great.

Regardas,

AG

red dirt girl said...

Hi AG ~ I love this quote: "…escribir es una suma de tenacidades…" Though google translates it as "Writing is the sum of toughness" I prefer it to say, "Writing is the sum of tenacity..." I shall look for Sr. Munoz Molina ...!

xxx

Alberto Granados said...

Writing is a sum of tenacities" is the correct translation. Tenacity, as perseverance, a positive value, instead toughness, that sounds a bit negative.
Mean books by AMM: The Polish rider, Sefarad (really hard: the human being looks like an always cruel creatur, able to do the bad in every country, conflict, century... though there is a small piece of hope), Night of times (about our civil war), Full moon (about a real crime that happened in Granada in the 80s)...

Anonymous said...

creature, not creatur (I might revise before pulling th Publish button).

AG

red dirt girl said...

Hi AG ~ Typos are welcome here :)

xxx

Phil Ruse said...

I know nothing about art (so am of no use!) but ever since Dru posted this on her blog, I have been intrigued. I love a good mystery, though it occurs to me someone may have solved this by now?

Purely by chance, I came across Sir William Orpen's "The Window Seat" and was struck by the similarity in pose and wondered if this was a familiar theme?

red dirt girl said...

Hi Phil,

Thank you for the link and comment. I've forwarded it onward to see what the rest of the group thinks. Looks remarkably similar and the time period is 'right' for the painting...

So glad you dropped by!
xxx