423b2e
423b2e

2.15.2012

francis ponge


Okay, okay --- since you asked, I've posted the rest of the poem, which I really don't like except for the first lines and the last line ....



"Inside the fog that encloses trees, they undergo the robbing of their leaves ..."

Thrown into confusion by a slow oxidation, and humiliated by the sap's withdrawal for the sake
of the flowers and fruits, the leaves, following hot spells of August, cling less anyway.

The up-and-down tunnels inside the bark deepen, and guide the moisture down to earth so as to
break off with the animated parts of the tree.

The flowers are scattered, the fruits taken away. This giving up of their more animated parts,
and even parts of their body, has become, since their earliest days, a familiar practice for trees.


from New of the Universe
- poems of the twofold world
translated by Robert Bly

via the beauty we love
xxx

6 comments:

gz said...

stunning

Adullamite said...

eh?




Nice pic.

goatman said...

Or the fog is hiding a replacement of leaves . . . either way

bulletholes said...

If I was going to peel a line from this, it would be (will be) that last one. Very elegant.

soubriquet said...

Ponge?

What an unfortunate name.

J Cosmo Newbery said...

Love the picture.